Instructional Leadership

Instructional Leadership course module
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$400
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This course module is a guide to independent and collaborative strategies and activities that promote effective instructional leadership. An effective instructional leader recognizes that improving student achievement is directly related to fostering excellence in teaching and learning. Standard 4: Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment, of The Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (NPBEA, 2015) states:

Effective educational leaders develop and support intellectually rigorous and coherent systems of curriculum, instruction, and assessment to promote each student’s academic success and well-being.”
Professional Standards for Educational Leaders, NPBEA, 2015

Instructional leaders foster excellence in teaching and learning by:

  • Assisting teachers to create active learning environments
  • Being a resource for effective instructional practices
  • Modeling instructional design for effective teaching and learning
  • Supervising instruction and empowering teachers
  • Evaluating personnel

In the role of instructional leader, consider the term ‘principal’ as both an adjective and a noun. The principal instructor in a school is the school principal. The role of the principal has changed dramatically over the years, with additional responsibilities tied to operational management and accountability. No longer is it expected that the principal be the most skilled and knowledgeable teacher in the school. Many schools employ teachers with greater expert knowledge in the subjects they teach than the principal. This evolution of instructional capacity makes it all the more important that the principal know how to lead, without having to be able to perform every task that expert faculty and staff are best equipped to do. Rather than being the teacher of teachers, the principal must be the leader of leaders, empowering teaching leaders to excel.


Please be advised: Some of the exercises and assignments in this course module require the participation of others (a peer, mentor, or small group). Who you collaborate with is your choice, but as you begin this course module, you should approach colleagues you trust, or share this course module with, to arrange for the participation of others when required.